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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN 23
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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
republican bob corker and other members of congress talking about this fiscal cliff. hosted by bloomberg government and the lloyd. this is about an hour. -- and deloitte. this is about an hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al
the fiscal cliff. this included chris van hollen. also, senators mark warner and bob corker, a republican from tennessee. this is one hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al hunt. we always love having al over here. he really pu
's the chief of staff to governor bob macdonald. to denise northrop came from state of oklahoma where she is chief of staff to governor mary phalen and roxanne white is joining us from the great state of colorado where she's chief of staff to governor john hicken looper. and so their full bios are on the pamphlets and nare all very accomplished professionals in their careers. i'm going to ask roxanne to start and we can come down this way. >> great. first, thank you for the report. i think it provides a good framework for all of us as states to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform in colorado. our pension fund is about 69% solvent. we did major reform in the last administration. and we are now in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs by 2020 will go to 22%. and so to give you a sense of how far behind we were as a state, if we lose in court and the battle is whether or not we as a state have a right to ratchet down the colas for our state employees, then we could see a need to go to 25% of compensation by 2020. so it's fairly
right now. thank you. host: thank you. we could get that information as well. bob, mich. on the independent line. good morning to you. bob are you there? i think we lost bob this morning. i want to talk with this issue of age discrimination and who is on unemployment insurance. here is an article from "the baltimore sun." 93,000 young adults in maryland are unemployed. what ages are on unemployment insurance at this point? guest: historical you tend to see younger workers with less experience on unemployment, because of this recession we see a much wider spread. more people with college degrees, older people taking on income and benefits of some kind, but the challenges once you get past the six-month blocked, the longer you are on unemployment without a job, the harder it is to find a job. if you have a college degree, and you really need to get a job, to some degree you can move down the economic ladder. you might not want to, it might not be positive for society, but when you do? pg when you do that, it pushes someone -- but when you do that, it pushes someone else fu
that. i am very old now and then these things or in a situation when we were talking to bob -- excuse me, not bob. your first name, david. david, by the way -- he is even older than i am. i want to know what he is eating for lunch so i can have the same thing. david is retired and in good shape. he has a son who needs physical assistance with prescriptions and medical costs. it makes a difference. a grown son who still needs help. you take away a couple thousand dollars out of your pocket next year, it matters. it is about $270 a month. that is real money. look, the thing that the folks around this table represent -- every one of these people are hard-working people. what impressed me most about them was they are even more worried about people who are poor, more worried about people who are out there struggling to put 1 foot in front of the other. we focused on wha tthe tax increase would mean to them. but it would also mean a great deal to the economy as well. it is estimated that this tax cut for the middle-class, if not passed, there will be $200 billion taken out of the economy ne
of democracies. this is just over one hour. >> good morning everyone. thank you, bob, for that introduction and thank you all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be a lively debate. we are going to be asking the question if democracy is to triumph in the middle east, victories at the ballot box are unavoidable and essential. this is the motion we will be debating in the intelligence- squared format per requests from our panelists who have done this once already -- they have had a practice round. they have not had a chance of doing this, but i suspect, had probably had several scotches and talked about ways to defeat their foes. we know that this is a time of revolution in the middle east. it started with a fruit sell seller in tunisia and toppled a 230-year dictator that spread to egypt and the egyptian revolution was concern to the united states. egypt has long held incredible importance to u.s. policy in the middle east. the u.s. reaction to that revolution was unclear. there were some that said this was a good thing that this would only lead to democracy. there
: it was voted down three consecutive times. host: here's an e-mail from bob and florida. making the economic argument against right-to-work state. and then there are people who have an economic argument on the other side of it. if we read a piece earlier in the washington post on what right-to-work states due to the broader economy. -- due to the state's economy? and now this isn't egypt. on the front page of the washington post, amid this turmoil, aid for egypt is on its way. the u.s. and a coalition of international lenders are pushing ahead with billions of dollars of loans and other help for egypt and neighboring states. so, money going to the country despite the violence there. and on the domestic front, the richmond times dispatch, courtesy of the newseum, health care law includes from a surprising $60 coverage free. bob in rapid city, south dakota, republican caller. caller: whee are a right-to- work state. in the past week we had an article in the newspaper that we are 16th in the nation in income. we averaged 44,000. where is the nation averages 41,000. so it's just not true that a
carney. c-span2 will be covering that live. and now bob woodward on his latest book "price of politics." he spoke with "politico's" chief white house correspondent mike allen and failing to chief a compromise. this is part of a "politico" playbook discussion. it's about 25 minutes. [applause] >> good morning. welcome to "playbook breakfast." thank you for coming out so early. we're excited to have an amazing double-header today. we are going to talk to senator rubio who last night gave a big speech, one of the first formal speeches looking ahead to the future of the republican party. we are going to talk to senator rubio about that. first we have the amazing treat of bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations, is going to be joining us in just a second. first, welcome, all the people out in livestream land. we'll be taking your questions on #politicobreakfast. tweet us. welcome to c-span and to others. we're appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership this year including the conventions an
a conversation about getting the fiscal house in order. i heard bob talking about that. it is true. we spend $1 trillion more than we take in. it's a fact and we have to address it. i approach this issue with the following belief. the only way to get it in order is through rapid economic growth. no taxes you can raise to bring the debt down. what the president is offering is not enough but will make a dent on job creation, particularly middle-class job creation. i oppose his plan. we should do real tax reform. if there are loopholes, there is a loophole for being able to write off your yacht as a second home. let's go after that. we need more revenue and the way you do that is through rapid economic growth. it's the only way to generate the kind of revenue you need and hold it. >> what's the only way you would raise tax rates on the top 2%? >> the number one issue is to grow the economy and creating jobs. i believe that proposal will hurt job creation. the tru millionaires, they have the best accountants and lawyers in america. do whatever you want, they are go to go maximize it. the people who
. and republican senator bob corker. also on the program is the israeli a bastard to the united states. cnn's state of the union follows and welcomes the managing director of the international monetary fund, christine lagarde. at 4:00 p.m., here "face the nation"where they talked with alan simpson and erskine bowles. also on the program, an interview with cory booker. the sunday network tv shows are repairing here on c-span at noon -- here on cspan radio. listen to them all on cspan radio on 90.1 fm in the washington, d.c. area and nationwide on siriusxm radio. [video clip] >> the staff had to make the plan for the invasion of japan without considering the atomic bomb. it was estimated that to cocker the land would cost 700,000 man and 500,000 of them would be maimed for life. >> i choose to honor both the sacrifice of american servicemen fighting their way through the pacific and a little girl like sadako who died as a result of the atomic bomb. it is unimaginable with the most of them like to be close to that we're that far ball or originated and the blast was strongest. >> follow the journey th
that will be calculated, and quite frankly, in a more simplified form been standard tax law. host: professor bob kelly? guest: when i say chaos i am -- professor buckley? >> when i say chaos, i am referring to two things. the irs has done programming based on their being a patch enacted by the end of the year. most tax returns software has made the same calculated gamble. i agree that the government needs revenue. i do not think there is any question of that. if you just say that the amt is a good tax because it raises revenue, i do not argue on the notion that we need money, however is an extraordinarily arbitrary way of raising revenue. it raises revenue not from the super wealthy. the amt applies to few people making more than half of $1 million. it is counter-intuitive. if you are going to raise revenue, it should be as president obama has suggested, shared sacrifice, and that sacrifice has to come from people making more than half of $1 million. host: how do the very wealthy get out of paying the amt? guest: because of the rate structure. the rate between $200,000 and $500,000 are at least as hig
to the floor. the bill is not moving along, says bob corker from tennessee. here is what the republican from idaho had to say about the fiscal cliff negotiation. [video clip] >> if we get down to the end of the year and the only choice we have is to save taxes going up on the middle-class, i would support that. but i wish we had a comprehensive bill that dealt with spending, entitlement, and taxes altogether. that is really what we ought to do. host: that was senator johnny isaacson from georgia, excuse me, not from idaho. we will go back to the question here for all of you. we will continue to give you news from the newspapers. but how does religion and law was your politics? democratic caller. go ahead. caller: i had originally called in response to set oralism in government, which i prefer -- secularism in government, which are for. a country which invites everyone into it, all religions and nationalities, must by definition be secular. any religious direction we choose is going to favor somebody, and i thought that is what we were trying to avoid. at least i thought that is what jefferso
giving me the dickens. after that we became very good friends and played golf together. bob michael was a wonderful leader. there was a spirit of camaraderie even though we had differences politically then that we do not have now. now it is much more combative. i have a lot of friends on the democratic side of the aisle, very good friends. as far as working things out is not as easy as it used to be. >> what are some of the root causes? >> i think and i am not pointing fingers, when we went after jim wright, newt was the speaker and jim was forced out of office. they went after newt. the combat became very personal. that is one of the things that started this movement. over time, i think it has become political as well as personal. much more political and personal. >> she said raising cain, are -- -- you said raising cain. you will the gavel for the oversight committee and use that to raise the number of investigations especially of the clinton administration. what do you see as your legacy of that tenure? >> i think bill clinton, president clinton and hilary as secretary of state d
will have failure. >> i will turn to the audience -- bob? >> i wanted to respond to the entitlement piece. i am a huge fan of paul ryan. i think the guy -- regardless of if you agree, he puts things out there and things about them. i think on entitlements it is very unfortunate the ryan budget did not do anything in the first 10 years. that created an unfortunate set of expectations. i agree -- $27 trillion of unfunded liabilities down the road. we can make changes right now to the medicare program that is not painful to seniors but painful to politicians. we can begin -- it begins to do the things we need to do. the best thing we can do for our country, the best thing we can do for those people struggling for jobs is to go ahead and do this now, put it in the rearview mirror. the only thing lacking is not intellect but political courage. secondly, we have to have entitlement reform that is real. this is where the money is. on the revenue case -- if you can get two people in the room, we can move beyond red lines as tim was saying and resolve this. among the mass of people on the democratic
bob casey cheers this joint economic committee hearing. it is one hour and 45 minutes. >> the committee will come to order. we want to thank everyone for being here today. i did not have a chance to personally greet our witnesses, but i will have time to do that later. i want to thank both of our witnesses for being here. i will have an opening statement that i will make, and then i will turn it to dr. burgess. i know that vice chairman brady will be her as well. we know the challenges that we confront here in congress on a whole range of issues, which are sometimes broadly described under the umbrella of the terminology, fiscal cliff. when we confront those difficult challenges, we have to ask ourselves a couple of basic questions. one of the basic questions we must ask is, what will be the result and will be the impact as it relates to middle income families? what will happen to them in the midst of all these tough issues we have to work out? we know there is broad agreement that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would jeopardize the economic recovery. it would d
hemisphere. i worked with some of my cuban- ileanaan friends, ke ros-lehtinen and bob menendez and we worked hard to put sanctions on castro to try to bring that regime down. it was not until the soviet mig that was shot down, they shot a couple of them down. one of them made it back. that created a huge for error -- furor. bill clinton was put in a difficult position. i was the author in the house and the jesse helms was the author in the senate and we worked together on the bill along with my cuban-american brands. >> that regime is still around. at the time, a number of our allies protested the bill. in the rearview mirror, how effective was it overall? do you feel good about that? >> it shows the repression is so strong in cuba, the ability of fidel castro to reach out to some of his "friends" around the world that he has been able to circumvent sanctions. i think we ought to do everything we can to bring freedom to the people of cuba. the helms-burton law was not as effective as i would have liked. >> another issue out you are associated with is autism. how did that get started? >> my g
york, bob mendez from new jersey and i believe senator gillibrand will be here shortly. the senators have been a strong partners in this rebuilding effort. it is a great privilege to work together. we are really strong team we share the value of a quick action and sufficient resources to get this job done. as i mentioned, we are in the largest transportation. in the country and it takes diligence and skill of our friends and colleagues. senator schumer. >> thank you, mr. chairman. first, thank you for this hearing but also for your great partnership. new york and new jersey were together as a bipartisan by- date delegation along with our colleagues from rest of the northeast to deal with this awful, awful devastation. it is good you are in so many important positions that will have a lot of say in how we deal with this and we're grateful forthank you, ranking , senator wicker. west hamilton beach was in my old congressional district. it is one of the few volunteer fire departments in new york city. it is right on the water, the great jamaica bay. the generosity of mississippi to west
we are heading in the same direction. thank you and have a wonderful new year. host: a tear from bob now in the democrat light. caller: thank you for letting me have a chance to speak. i am more optimistic -- i a more pessimistic than optimistic. i just do not think they will ever get together like they should. my one comment is when they start speaking about the cuts and the entitlements, the always a social security, medicare, medicaid. that is not the only entitlements. every government program that has a retirement benefit, a health-care benefit, those are entitlements, two, up to and including the entitlements for the congressman. let's be fair. when they start talking about entitlements and hold it to those three items, let's hold their feet to the fire and make them talk about entitlements for the other folks, too. host: appreciate you calling this morning. donna writes about this on twitter. if that to facebook here. -- back to you facebook here. budget showdown hits the keep week. that is of the front page reminding us of the deadline looming. it is a bloomberg story here ou
take responsibility for it. i can remember bob michael former republican leader in the house saying i'm proud of voting for this. if you want a two bit congressman vote for somebody else. he kept getting reelected. host: john now on the democratic line. caller: good morning. thanks for having me on. my main thing is saying i think the problem is our g.d.p. we don't produce anything. we don't create any jobs. as far as china is concerned, we don't tariff, we don't put that high of a tariff on their imports but yet i don't know the exact numbers but i believe it's a lot higher that they tax our imports in their country. and the whole thing with jobs. he created the apple scommuret in california in his garage but yet when he got successful he moves all his company over to china, giving chinese people jobs. if steve jobs was born in china he wouldn't even have a garage therefore he wouldn't be able to create the apple computer. so i just think we just don't do enough for the people of this country. and the people who are in position to create jobs and do this do not reinvest in the countr
with remarks from incoming house foreign affairs committee chairman ed roadways and -- royce and bob kasey. they'll be discussing the war in syria and tensions in iran later today and look at the arab spring and nonproliferation risks and remarks from senators. that gets under way at 1:30. president obama and the first family will participate this evening in the annual lighting of the national christmas tree. actor neil patrick harris will m.c. the ceremony which will include performances from james taylor and the musical group the frey. that's live here on c-span beginning at 4:30 eastern. >> this weekend on c-span 3's american history tv, follow harry truman's elvis grandson to hiroshima as the city prepared to mark the dropping of the bomb in 1945. >> everybody has their own view of what happened. and i don't want to argue -- [inaudible] with anyone in japan about the history. i think we're past that. my purpose for being here is to listen, to honor the dead, to listen to the living. and to do what i can so to see that this doesn't happen again. >> cliffton truman daniel will join us in
are pleased to have our distinguished colleagues chuck schumer from new york, bob mendez from new jersey and i believe senator gillibrand will be here shortly. the senators have been a strong partners in this rebuilding effort. it is a great privilege to work together. we are really strong team we share the value of a quick action and sufficient resources to get this job done. as i mentioned, we are in the largest transportation. in the country and it takes diligence and skill of our friends and colleagues. senator schumer. >> thank you, mr. chairman. first, thank you for this hearing but also for your great partnership. new york and new jersey were together as a bipartisan by-date delegation along with our colleagues from rest of the northeast to deal with this awful, awful devastation. it is good you are in so many important positions that will have a lot of say in how we deal with this and we're grateful for that as well as your leadership. thank you, ranking member, senator wicker. west hamilton beach was in my old congressional district. it is one of the few volunteer fire departments in
says our economic security is at risk if we do not cut down the debt. secretary bob gates said it is in the international security. is that theater? is the national debt and illusion? americans do not think so. today we will start acting. we will start acting and we will do something else -- we will cut taxes. we will defer the tax cut. except for the millionaires, those making over $1 million. we will let those tax rates go back up, which is exactly what nancy pelosi proposed. we will take her proposal. and mr. van hollen says it will not give one a democratic road or something -- for something your leader proposed three months ago. that as political theater, mr. van hollen. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i wish the outgoing chairman of financial services well. this policy did not make the tax proposal that would -- nancy pelosi did not have a tax proposal that would give people earning over $1 million in tax break. no. 2, the proposal the president has put on the table has trillions of dollars of cuts, which is more than in the cuts on the table and would deal with the sequestere
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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